Deadpool 2 is the perfect comic book pick-me-up after such a depressing ending to Avengers: Infinity War (womp womp).  This sequel is filled with action, pop culture references, and plenty of breaking of the fourth wall by our leading protagonist and hero, Deadpool (really he is more of an anti-hero but it’s easier to write hero so I don’t have to go on a tangent where I juxtapose him to the Dark Knight).

Years have passed since the previous film and now Deadpool (Ryan Reynolds) is a world-class mercenary, killing baddies across seas.  Life is great for Deadpool until a significant plot twist occurs (spoilers, spoilers, spoilers) and now Cable (Josh Brolin) is here from the future to kill a young mutant named Russell (Julian Dennison) who in the future kills his family and causes a lot of mayhem (hey, this sounds like the plot to Terminator).

Deadpool 2 then follows suit to the same story structure as many other comic films.  His world expands and he meets other superheroes, like Domino (Zazie Beetz) who has the odd power of always being lucky and several other mutants, similar to how Tony Stark meets Black Widow in Iron Man 2.  Deadpool also is facing a stoic and ultra strong antagonist (Thanos, I mean Cable) who is the perfect foil similar to the Dark Knight and the Joker.

The real hero of this film is Ryan Reynolds who holds his own as a leading actor in an action/comedy film, which are two completely different genres that are well meshed into one.  His comedic timing and delivery of absolutely ridiculous lines is spot on down to every millisecond.  I left wondering how much of his lines were scripted or spur of the moment?

Though the film is a similar plot to almost every superhero film it is incredibly unique, original, and just plain fun (for those who are seventeen and older) thank to incredibly talented writing.  Writers Rhett Reese, Paul Wernick, and of course Ryan Reynolds set the pace for a fast action film with quick jokes that can easily be missed.  Some jokes hit you right on the nose and are not as smart and fall flat, but most were over-the-top and left me laughing out loud.

Looking past all the jokes and jabs, the musical score is flat out brilliant.  Accompanying 1980s love songs to mass violence and action aligns beautifully into a heaping amount of irony and nostalgia.  How many comic book films or even action films can pull that off?  We often forget that sound and music essentially make up have the film and this film takes pride in showing off a meticulously planned soundtrack.

The beauty of the Deadpool films is they can truly take a step back and satire and laugh at a genre filled with films that blend together.  Deadpool is a reactionary character created in the 1990’s when comic books began to fall flat.  As comic book films are now becoming homogenous or just plain bad (I’m restraining from ripping apart even more the recent DC films).

Even though I loved this film, I simply enjoyed the first Deadpool film more.  Though the jokes and style of the film was pushed even further than the last one I found myself enjoying the first one more because I did not know what to expect.  Deadpool broke so many comic book molds that now that the mold has been broken I am left wanting something else to break.

Leaving the theater I wondered where will the series go now?  I am sure Deadpool 2 will be incredibly successful at the box office like it’s predecessor and make a ton of cash.  Hopefully, the series can afford to bring in even more X-Men or even crossover to the other series.  Regardless, this is not the last time we will see Deadpool on the big screen (I hope so, I really enjoy breaking the fourth wall when writing, or is it the third? Meh, go see Deadpool 2.)

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